New Sports Books

Sam and Charlie (and Sam Too!) by Leslie Kimmelman

Grades 1-3

Sam is excited about his new neighbors, especially when he overhears someone yelling "Charlie, don't forget your baseball mitt!"

Sam runs over to meet his new neighbors, Charlie (short for Charlene, but never call her that) and Sam Too, Charlie's little sister. The three new friends have a lot in common other than their names and their love of baseball and hamentaschen. 

In this fun beginning chapter book, play baseball, celebrate Purim, sneeze on a sick day, and much more with new friends Sam and Charlie (and Sam Too!).

Find this book in our library.

More books by Leslie Kimmelman and Stefano Tambellini.

For other early chapter books about good friends, try:

Pinky and Rex by James Howe (series)

Iris and Walter by Elissa Hadden Guest (series)

Mimi and Mati to the Rescue: Roger the Rat is on the Loose! by Brooke Smith

Bink and Gollie by Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee

Justin Case: Shells, Smells, and the Horrible Flip-Flops of Doom by Rachel Vail

Grades 2-5

If you thought Justin had a worrisome and difficult third-grade year, just wait until you read about his summer at Camp GoldenBrook.

After third-grade, Justin is determined to stop worrying so much - until he finds out he's going to a camp that is probably going to kill him - if his flip-flops don't do the job first.

Fans of Alvin Ho or the Wimpy Kid series will love Justin's humorous attempts at bravery, and find Justin to be a welcome friend.

Find this book on our shelves.
More books by Rachel Vail.
Read the first book in the Justin Case series.

Other series about kids like Justin:
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Greg Kinney
Alvin Ho by Lenore Look
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Mason Dixon by Claudia Mills

Stand-alone books you may enjoy:
Herbert's Wormhole by Peter Nelson
The Thing about Georgie by Lisa Graff
Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin
 

 

The Contender by Robert Lipsyte

Reading Level: Grades 7+

"Boxing is a dying sport. People aren't much interested anymore. They want easy things, like television, bowling, car rides."

Alfred Brooks wants to be somebody special - a champion. Donatelli assures him that's impossible - first Alfred has to train - train so hard he'll start to feel like it's not worth it, that he should just quit - that he'll never be a fighter at all, let alone a contender. But Alfred is determined, and begins to train, hard. When he's boxing, Alfred doesn't have to think about all the bad stuff going on in his life, it's just him and the ring, nothing going on outside it matters at all. Inside the ring, Alfred can contend with his life.

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More books by Robert Lipsyte

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