Information and Reader Services

 

      2015 Fiction Staff Recommends

      The Information & Reader Services staff have compiled our choices for the 2015 Fiction Staff Recommends.

       

       

      Atkinson, Kate. A God in Ruins.

      A companion novel to 2013's Life After Life, A God in Ruins follows the life of Teddy Todd as he navigates the personal and global events of the 20th century. Beautifully written and stylistically profound, this novel will stay with you long after you have finished. The extraordinary life of one ordinary man.

      Bolton, Sharon.  Little Black Lies.

      In the early "90s, children started going missing in a small community in the Falkland Islands. This directly affects three specific Islanders- Catrin, a woman who lost her sons in a terrible accident, Callum, a troubled veteran of the Falkland War, and Rachel, Catrin's former best friend. I loved this book for being more interested in examining how loss and violence and grief change people and relationships than in being a simple whodunnit about missing children.

      Brandt, Harry and Price, Richard. The Whites.

      Follow the life of Billy Graves who is the night shift commander of a New York police department. Witness as they endure the stresses of the job and the daily grind of their everyday life. I enjoyed this book because of the character development. This book is authentic; it felt like I was watching the TV show "The Wire" but in a book. Gritty and thought provoking.

      Cantor, Jillian. The Hours Count.

      A fascinating fictional account of Ethyl and Julius Rosenberg told from the point of view of a neighbor who gets involved with more that she can handle as she wonders whether her own husband is a spy. It's a window into the cold war and life in post-World War II New York City.

      Flournay, Angela. The Turner House.

      The thirteen Turner children all grew up in the house on Yarrow Street on Detroit's East Side. Now, as their ailing Mother is forced to leave home and move in with her eldest son, the family discovers the house is worth next to nothing. The Turner children must come together in order to decide the fate of their childhood home while also confronting the ghosts of their pasts.

      Freeman, Anna. The Fair Fight.

      Two unlikely women in Regency England cross paths and change each others destinies. Ruth, a tough prize-fighter raised in a Bristol brothel, and Charlotte, manor-born and suffocated by class expectations, meet after Ruth suffers a disastrous defeat in the ring. Fast-paced and overflowing with historical detail, The Fair Fight is a spirited story of courage and power.

      Gornick, Lisa. Louisa Meets Bear.

      A quietly powerful collection of linked short stories surrounding two ill-fated lovers, Louisa and Bear. With each new story, the reader must decipher the relationship the character has to Louisa and Bear; where they crossed paths during their lifetimes. These interwoven tales of love and family are engrossing and deeply human.

      Hareven, Gail. Lies, First Person.

      A middle-aged Israeli woman in a comfortable marriage with well-adjusted children finds her life spinning out of control when her estranged uncle, author of the novel "Hitler, First Person," and molester of her sister, announces he's coming for a visit. This novel was brilliant, from the writing style (especially the unreliable, circular narration), all the way to how it gets the reader (me, in this case) to think about how we really talk about, deal with, and confront evil.

      Miller, Frank. Batman: The Dark Knight Saga.

      The thrilling conclusion to the Dark Knight saga is now here. Batman returns to face his greatest challenge... the dawn of a master race. Written by Frank Miller, author of The Dark Knight Returns, arguably one of the greatest graphic novels ever.

      Morton, Kate. The Lake House.

      A young boy disappears during a lavish party at his family's estate in Cornwall. The case remains i=unsolved for 60 years until a young detective stumbles upon the abandoned estate and seeks to unlock its many secrets including what happened on the night the child went missing. History, family, mystery, and a split yet deftly interlocking time frame make Kate Morton's latest novel a wonderful page turner.

      Moshfegh, Otessa. Eileen.

      The title character leads a dreary, narrow existence both at home with her abusive, alcoholic father and at her office job as a boys' juvenile detention center. Eileen is hopeful that the weight of her innate strangeness and isolation will finally be alleviated by a beautiful, young psychologist who joins the staff at work. But the looming sense of dread and unease that is present from the novel's beginning is frighteningly justified at the novel's end.

      Russell, Mary Doria. Epitaph: a novel of the O.K. Corral.

      We all think we know the story of Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, and the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. In this historical novel, Mary Doria Russell makes life and death in Tombstone, Arizona, come alive with historical details about the U.S. Marshalls, justice in the old west, and how Earp's wife, Josephine, made sure that the Wyatt Earp legend would live on.

      Snyder, Scott. Wytches: Volume 1.

      Scott Snyder's new series is soon to be a horror comic classic. Throughout the years, many people died or were persecuted because of witchcraft. None of these people were witches, but the true witches that so exist are even scarier and more frightening then you could possibly imagine. These witches are mysterious, rare, secretive, but quite deadly.

      Tremayne, S. K. The Ice Twins.

      Is it Kirstie or Lydia? After one of their identical twin daughters dies in an accident, Angus and Sarah Moorcraft move to a tiny Scottish island hoping to rebuild their lives. As their surviving daughter grows increasingly disturbed, new revelations come to light as to what happened on that fateful day. The suspenseful and creepy atmosphere heighten the isolation and fear within the characters and haunt the reader until the very end.

      Tyler, Anne. A Spool of Blue Thread.

      Anchored by their Baltimore home, four generations of the Whitshank family are revealed through the emotion complexities that all families have. Humorous, dazzling and impeccably written, this novel was short listed for the Man Booker Prize.

      Ware, Ruth. In a Dark, Dark Wood.

      For a first novel, Ware writes an excellent thriller with much suspense, a bit of humor in the right places and a number of characters with flaws. Many old friends are reacquainted, at Clare's hen party. For Nora, it has been 10 years since she has seen her once best friend. What secrets will be revealed? Should Nora trust her gut or is it just Nora's guarded personality? Forget about making dinner, this book is a thrilling story which will keep you guessing until the end.

      Reference blog categories: 

      Chicago Consumers Checkbook

      Did you know that you have access to Chicago Consumers Checkbook from home with your library card. This resource includes reviews and ratings of local service providers and products including automobiles, health care, home care, pets, stores, and much more. Click here for more information.

      Reference blog categories: 

      Pages