Tax Forms

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Illinois Department of Revenue will supply the Library with a limited number of 1040 forms and instruction booklets. We have received the forms and instructions from both the IRS and Illinois Department of Revenue. (2/10/16)

IRS Tax Forms for Individuals and Small Businesses

The Library will receive the following forms:

  • 1040 forms and instruction booklets
  • 1040A forms and instruction booklets
  • 1040EZ forms and instruction booklets
  • Publication 17 (one Reference copy)
  • IRS Reproducible forms

How to obtain IRS forms, instructions, and publications

  • www.IRS.gov: View and print forms, instructions, and publications.
  • www.IRS.gov/orderforms: Order your individual and business forms, instructions, and publications and receive paper copies via U.S. Mail.
  • www.IRS.gov/orderforms/ebooks: Free downloadable ebook version of popular tax publications and instruction booklets.
  • Call (800) 829-3676: To order print forms, instruction, and publications to receive paper copies via U.S. Mail.

Visit an IRS Office (Monday- Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.)

  • 230 S. Dearborn St., Chicago IL 60604 - (312) 292-4912
  • 5100 River Rd., Schiller Park IL 60176 - (847) 737-6688

Local Help

  • Moraine Township:  Call for an appointment (847) 780-6644. From February 1 through April 9, Moraine Township will offer free assistance to low-and-moderate-income taxpayers filing their 2015 income tax returns through the IRS VITA Program (Voluntary Income Tax Assistance).
  • AARP Foundation Tax Aide is available free to taxpayers with low and moderate income, with special attention to those 60 and older.
  • IRS Tax Payer Advocate Service: Call (312) 292-3800 in Chicago.

Illinois Department of Revenue Tax Forms for Individuals and Small Businesses

The Library will receive limited number of the Illinois 1040 form and instruction booklets, and Schedule ICR.

How to Obtain Illinois Tax Forms

  • Tax.Illinois.gov: View and print forms, instructions, and publications. File online.
  • Call The Illinois Department of Revenue (Monday- Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) to receive paper copies of the forms and instructions via U.S. Mail.
  • Forms Order Line: (800) 356-6302
  • TTD: (800) 544-5304
  • Assistance for Individuals: (800) 732-8866 or (217) 782-3336
  • Business Hot Line: (217) 524-4772

Visit an Illinois Department of Revenue Office (Monday- Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)

  • James R. Thompson Center, Concourse Level, 100 W. Randolph St., Chicago, IL 60601, (800) 732-8866
  • Maine North Regional Building, 9511 Harrison Ave., Des Plaines, IL 60016, (847) 294-4200

Need Additional Help?

For help in navigating the IRS and Illinois Department of Revenue web sites, printing forms, or online ordering of forms and instructions, please ask an Information & Reader Services Librarian or call (847) 681-7031.

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Novelist Plus Available Now

NoveList Plus is the premiere database for reading recommendations. It is a comprehensive source of information about books that includes expert recommendations, reviews, articles, lists and more. One may access it either through our online resources page or the home page of the catalog. 

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2015 Nonfiction Staff Recommends

The Information & Reader Services Staff have compiled our choices for the 2015 Nonfiction Staff Recommends.

Bell, Gertrude and Howell, Georgina. A Woman in Arabia: the writings of the Queen of the Desert.

Writings of the brilliant and multifaceted Gertrude Bell, an English woman who devoted her life to traveling and understanding the Arab world. Her exceptional grasp of the difficult Arabic language made her a valuable agent for the British dealing with early 20th century Arabs. Sometimes referred to as "the female Lawrence of Arabia".

Cavolo, Ricardo. 101 Artists to Listen to Before You Die.

I have an uneven relationship with graphic novels, but this one is not only visually stimulating, it's fun and informative too (and I picked up several new artists to try out as well).

Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me.

In this heartfelt memoir/letter to his teenage son, Coates reflects on racial identity, its impact on his life and on his son's future. A stirring message for all people that black lives matter.

Cornwell, Bernard. Waterloo: the history of four days, three armies, and three battles.

Cornwell, normally a historical fiction writer, authors a compelling work of nonfiction in Waterloo. The book takes the reader through the grueling four days of the Battle of Waterloo from the perspective of Napoleon and Wellington. It is fascinating to learn these two leaders, known as the best military minds of their time, took small missteps on each of their parts that could have led to a different outcome. A great book for history buffs.

Day, Felicia. You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost).

A delightful, smart, and funny book about the one of a kind Ms. Day, who had a quirky upbringing, which probably helped her navigate an even more unusual career.

Edin, Kathryn J. $2.00 a Day: living on almost nothing in America.

An examination about extreme poverty in America; why has poverty increased over the past 20 years, how do these families survive on little or no income, and how can the country address the issue of income inequality.

Goldberg, Daniel and Larsson, Linus. The State of Play: creators and critics on video game culture.

As a non-gamer, I was enthralled by the 14 essays in this book that explored and discussed issues of gaming entertainment, such as race, gender, violence, death, sex, and fantasy. It raised points that I'll be thinking about for quite awhile.

Goodman, Simon. The Orpheus Clock: the search for my family's art treasures stolen by the Nazis.

When Simon Goodman's father passed away, he left behind boxes of files revealing he was not the quintessential British gentleman they thought he was. Born Bernard Guttman, primary heir of a prominent German banking family, Bernard had been trying to recover the family's extensive art collection plundered during World War II. Simon and his brother take up the search and learn their heartbreaking family history in the process.

Green, Kristen. Something Must Be Done About Prince Edward County: a family, a Virginia town, a civil rights battle.

After the Brown v the Board of Education decision, Prince Edward County, VA., closed its public schools and opened private, all-white schools. The author examines the effect of the closure on the community and her family's role in the decision.

Larson, Eric. Dead Wake: the last crossing of the Lusitania.

Larson does it again! The suspenseful dual narrative of Dead Wake captures the looming disaster as experienced by those who lived it, the sad reckoning of lives lost, and the inevitable "if only" we could reach across time to send a warning.

Lyndsey, Anna. Girl in the Dark: a memoir.

Imagine being allergic to light. That is Anna's reality. Once an ambitious young woman, she is now confined to live most of her days in a completely blacked-out room. Fascinatingly, she continues on with her life, fighting against the unbearable loneliness and instead finding the beauty in her new existence. A resonating and brave story.

Marsh, Henry. Do No Harm: stories of life, death, and brain surgery.

Marsh, one of Britain's foremost neurosurgeons, shares stories from the surgery in this riveting memoir, an examination of the exhilaration of successful operations and the despair of failure. Candid and compassionate.

McCullough, David. The Wright Brothers.

McCullough is a master storyteller at his best in relating the amazing story of two "ordinary" men whose genius, courage, innovation, and perseverance achieved human flight.

Rauchway, Eric. Money Makers: how Roosevelt and Keynes ended the depression, defeated fascism, and secured a prosperous peace.

Who was John Maynard Keynes and why does it still matter? An innovative economist and a bold president introduced a monetary policy with far-reaching effects that continues to influence the global economy. Worth more that the paper it's printed on.

Turkle, Sherry. Reclaiming Conversation: the power of a talk in a digital age.

Wonderful book. Amazing as it touches on so many aspects of our lives that are interlinked with technology. If you keep your smart phone on the table during dinner... read this.

Wulf, Andrea. The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's new world.

An attractive and engaging biography of Alexander von Humboldt, a somewhat forgotten 19th century giant in the field of natural sciences. A native of Germany, he spent time as a young man on scientific expeditions in Latin America, where began his vision of the natural world as holistic and interdependent, a foundation of the modern concept of environmentalism.

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2015 Fiction Staff Recommends

The Information & Reader Services staff have compiled our choices for the 2015 Fiction Staff Recommends.

 

 

Atkinson, Kate. A God in Ruins.

A companion novel to 2013's Life After Life, A God in Ruins follows the life of Teddy Todd as he navigates the personal and global events of the 20th century. Beautifully written and stylistically profound, this novel will stay with you long after you have finished. The extraordinary life of one ordinary man.

Bolton, Sharon.  Little Black Lies.

In the early "90s, children started going missing in a small community in the Falkland Islands. This directly affects three specific Islanders- Catrin, a woman who lost her sons in a terrible accident, Callum, a troubled veteran of the Falkland War, and Rachel, Catrin's former best friend. I loved this book for being more interested in examining how loss and violence and grief change people and relationships than in being a simple whodunnit about missing children.

Brandt, Harry and Price, Richard. The Whites.

Follow the life of Billy Graves who is the night shift commander of a New York police department. Witness as they endure the stresses of the job and the daily grind of their everyday life. I enjoyed this book because of the character development. This book is authentic; it felt like I was watching the TV show "The Wire" but in a book. Gritty and thought provoking.

Cantor, Jillian. The Hours Count.

A fascinating fictional account of Ethyl and Julius Rosenberg told from the point of view of a neighbor who gets involved with more that she can handle as she wonders whether her own husband is a spy. It's a window into the cold war and life in post-World War II New York City.

Flournay, Angela. The Turner House.

The thirteen Turner children all grew up in the house on Yarrow Street on Detroit's East Side. Now, as their ailing Mother is forced to leave home and move in with her eldest son, the family discovers the house is worth next to nothing. The Turner children must come together in order to decide the fate of their childhood home while also confronting the ghosts of their pasts.

Freeman, Anna. The Fair Fight.

Two unlikely women in Regency England cross paths and change each others destinies. Ruth, a tough prize-fighter raised in a Bristol brothel, and Charlotte, manor-born and suffocated by class expectations, meet after Ruth suffers a disastrous defeat in the ring. Fast-paced and overflowing with historical detail, The Fair Fight is a spirited story of courage and power.

Gornick, Lisa. Louisa Meets Bear.

A quietly powerful collection of linked short stories surrounding two ill-fated lovers, Louisa and Bear. With each new story, the reader must decipher the relationship the character has to Louisa and Bear; where they crossed paths during their lifetimes. These interwoven tales of love and family are engrossing and deeply human.

Hareven, Gail. Lies, First Person.

A middle-aged Israeli woman in a comfortable marriage with well-adjusted children finds her life spinning out of control when her estranged uncle, author of the novel "Hitler, First Person," and molester of her sister, announces he's coming for a visit. This novel was brilliant, from the writing style (especially the unreliable, circular narration), all the way to how it gets the reader (me, in this case) to think about how we really talk about, deal with, and confront evil.

Miller, Frank. Batman: The Dark Knight Saga.

The thrilling conclusion to the Dark Knight saga is now here. Batman returns to face his greatest challenge... the dawn of a master race. Written by Frank Miller, author of The Dark Knight Returns, arguably one of the greatest graphic novels ever.

Morton, Kate. The Lake House.

A young boy disappears during a lavish party at his family's estate in Cornwall. The case remains i=unsolved for 60 years until a young detective stumbles upon the abandoned estate and seeks to unlock its many secrets including what happened on the night the child went missing. History, family, mystery, and a split yet deftly interlocking time frame make Kate Morton's latest novel a wonderful page turner.

Moshfegh, Otessa. Eileen.

The title character leads a dreary, narrow existence both at home with her abusive, alcoholic father and at her office job as a boys' juvenile detention center. Eileen is hopeful that the weight of her innate strangeness and isolation will finally be alleviated by a beautiful, young psychologist who joins the staff at work. But the looming sense of dread and unease that is present from the novel's beginning is frighteningly justified at the novel's end.

Russell, Mary Doria. Epitaph: a novel of the O.K. Corral.

We all think we know the story of Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, and the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. In this historical novel, Mary Doria Russell makes life and death in Tombstone, Arizona, come alive with historical details about the U.S. Marshalls, justice in the old west, and how Earp's wife, Josephine, made sure that the Wyatt Earp legend would live on.

Snyder, Scott. Wytches: Volume 1.

Scott Snyder's new series is soon to be a horror comic classic. Throughout the years, many people died or were persecuted because of witchcraft. None of these people were witches, but the true witches that so exist are even scarier and more frightening then you could possibly imagine. These witches are mysterious, rare, secretive, but quite deadly.

Tremayne, S. K. The Ice Twins.

Is it Kirstie or Lydia? After one of their identical twin daughters dies in an accident, Angus and Sarah Moorcraft move to a tiny Scottish island hoping to rebuild their lives. As their surviving daughter grows increasingly disturbed, new revelations come to light as to what happened on that fateful day. The suspenseful and creepy atmosphere heighten the isolation and fear within the characters and haunt the reader until the very end.

Tyler, Anne. A Spool of Blue Thread.

Anchored by their Baltimore home, four generations of the Whitshank family are revealed through the emotion complexities that all families have. Humorous, dazzling and impeccably written, this novel was short listed for the Man Booker Prize.

Ware, Ruth. In a Dark, Dark Wood.

For a first novel, Ware writes an excellent thriller with much suspense, a bit of humor in the right places and a number of characters with flaws. Many old friends are reacquainted, at Clare's hen party. For Nora, it has been 10 years since she has seen her once best friend. What secrets will be revealed? Should Nora trust her gut or is it just Nora's guarded personality? Forget about making dinner, this book is a thrilling story which will keep you guessing until the end.

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Chicago Consumers Checkbook

Did you know that you have access to Chicago Consumers Checkbook from home with your library card. This resource includes reviews and ratings of local service providers and products including automobiles, health care, home care, pets, stores, and much more. Click here for more information.

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The Peanuts eComic Now Available on Hoopla

Did you see the new Peanuts movie this weekend? You can read the eComic about Charlie Brown and his pals through your smart phone or tablet using the library's Hoopla service. Simply click here to create an account and begin laughing with Snoopy and company.

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Event Notifications

Patrons who have signed up for notifications about, or confirmations of, events happening at the Library, might receive an email requesting that they verify their email address. This email comes from hpplevents@evancedevents.com. Please follow the directions and verify your email address if you wish to keep receiving such notifications or confirmations.

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Automatically Check Out a Hold in My Media Mall

You can now set your preference to ‘auto-checkout’ a hold on a title when it becomes available. Users who select this option will receive a notification when their title is available confirming that it has been checked out and can be found on their Account bookshelf.

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Fantastic Halloween Entertainment with Hoopla

Scare up some great Halloween entertainment this month with Hoopla. Check out some great Halloween titles in October including movies, tv shows, and comics. Watch a scary movie like Halloween II, laugh at the spooky antics of The Addams Family, or read about the undead in the popular eComic, The Walking Dead. Click here to get started.

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And the winner is

With 20.9% of the vote, A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle won the first annual Favorite Banned/Challenged Book poll.  Published in 1962, winner of the Newbery Medal, Sequoyah Book Award, and Lewis Carroll Shelf Award, this favorite of readers of all ages has never been out of print.

It is frequently challenged for undermining religious beliefs and allegations that it promotes witchcraft.  Thanks to everyone who voted!  Here is a rundown of the results.

picture of pie graph

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